Teenager Charged as an Adult in Fulton County

There are two reasons why a minor might be charged as an adult. The first is they’re 17. Even though you’re not considered an adult until your 18th birthday for most things – i.e. voting, buying tobacco or a weapon – in the Georgia criminal justice system you are an adult at your 17th birthday.

The other reason is the crime the child is charged with. Under OCGA § 15-11-560 a child that is at least 13 will be charged as an adult in Superior Court if they are alleged to have committed certain crimes. These crimes include murder, rape, aggravated sodomy, aggravated child molestation, aggravated sexual battery, armed robbery with a firearm, and aggravated assault or battery against a police officer. However, there are circumstances that allow these types of cases to be sent back to Juvenile Court.

Every case is different and if your child has been charged as an adult it is imperative to seek out an experienced attorney. Give us a call for a free case consultation.

First Offender in Fulton County

If you have been charged with a felony offense (with some exceptions) and have never pleaded guilty to or been convicted of a felony, you may be eligible for First Offender treatment under OCGA § 42-8-60. Charges that are considered serious violent felonies, e.g. murder, armed robbery, kidnapping, etc. and sexual offenses are not eligible for First Offender treatment.

First Offender allows you to enter a plea to the offense, but it is not considered a conviction. If you successfully complete all the terms of the sentence, the case will be discharged and you will be exonerated as a matter of law. This means that you can honestly say that you have not been convicted of a felony and all of your civil rights are restored.

This is a once in a lifetime opportunity and if you or a loved one has been charged with a felony offense and you think you might be eligible for First Offender, please give us a call at 404-581-0999.

How Other Acts Evidence Can Benefit a Criminal Defendant

The State often uses “other acts” evidence to introduce other bad things that a defendant has done to a jury. While the State cannot bring this evidence in to show that the defendant has a bad character, they can bring the evidence in if they can convince a judge that they are doing so to prove something like motive, intent, knowledge, identity, plan, or purpose. These exceptions are all part of the Georgia Rules of Evidence and can be found in O.C.G.A § 24-4-404(b) (often referred to as 404(b) evidence).

But the defense can use these powerful exceptions to their advantage to introduce other bad acts of an alleged victim to the jury (often call reverse 404(b) evidence). Here is an example of how reverse 404(b) evidence could be used to your advantage:

Imagine that you are working in your garage and see a teenager approach your elderly neighbor’s front door. You see the teenager peering in windows and you feel that the teenager is going to harm your elderly neighbor. You approach the teenager, with your firearm by your side, and ask them to leave the property. The teenager reports your behavior to the police and you suddenly find yourself facing criminal charges.

Luckily, you have hired one of the lawyers at W. Scott Smith who begins thoroughly investigating your case and discovers that only two weeks after the incident at your neighbor’s, the teenager is arrested for breaking into another house nearby. By utilizing Rule 404(b) your lawyer is able to introduce this other robbery evidence to a jury to show that the teenager intended to rob your neighbor and that you were justified in approaching the teenager with your firearm.

If you are charged with a serious crime like murder or aggravated assault, it is important that you hire an experienced lawyer who will thoroughly investigate your case and fight to admit any evidence that helps to prove your innocence. If you are charged in Gwinnett, Cobb, Fulton, Dekalb, Clayton, or Newton County, and believe that there is evidence that should be admitted about an alleged victim, call our office at 404-581-0999 today for a free consultation.

How do I get out of Fulton County Jail?

I’ve Been Arrested…

You are in handcuffs and headed to the Fulton County Jail. You want to get out as soon as possible. Your loved ones are in a panic to find a lawyer to help get a bond set. Rice Street is not a good place to be.

What do I do?

First, do not make any statements to the police while you are being transported to the Fulton County Jail.

Second, do not make any statements about the facts of your case to anyone at the Fulton County Jail. This is not the time to plead your innocence. Your sole focus should be on getting out on bond.

Do NOT talk on the jail phones about the case. All calls at Rice Street are being recorded. Just focus on getting someone to help get you out of jail.

When is my court date?

If you are arrested on a misdemeanor, you will go in front of a Magistrate Judge the following morning at 9am.

If you are arrested on a felony, you will go in front of a Magistrate Judge the following morning at 1130am.

Court is typically done by Zoom but you can go to the courtroom at the Fulton County jail.

Can I get a bond?

The Fulton County Judge is required to consider four factors when setting a bond.

  1. Poses no significant risk of fleeing from the jurisdiction of the court or failing to appear in court when required;
  2. Poses no significant threat or danger to any person, to the community, or to any property in the community;
  3. Poses no significant risk of committing any felony pending trial;
  4. Poses no significant risk of intimidating witnesses or otherwise obstructing the administration of justice.

Some crimes must go before a Superior Court judge in order to have a bond set. If you are charged with any of these specific crimes in Fulton County then the Magistrate Judge cannot set a bond at your initial court appearance. All that will happen at this appearance, is the judge will read the warrants to you and reset your case.

The crimes that are only bondable by a Superior Court judge are as follows:

  1. Treason
  2. Murder
  3. Rape
  4. Aggravated Sodomy
  5. Armed Robbery
  6. Aircraft hijacking and hijacking a motor vehicle
  7. Aggravated Child Molestation
  8. Aggravated Sexual Battery
  9. Manufacturing, distributing, delivering, dispensing, administering, or selling any controlled substance classified under Code Section 16-13-25 as Schedule 1 or under Code Section 16-13-26 as Schedule II
  10. Violating Code Section 16-13-31 or 16-13-31.1
  11. Kidnapping, arson, aggravated assault, or burglary if the person, at the time of the alleged kidnapping, arson, aggravated assault, or burglary, had been previously convicted of, was on probation or parole with respect to, or was on bail for kidnapping, arson, aggravated assault, burglary, or one or more of the offenses listed above.
  12. Aggravated Stalking

For any of these crimes that are bondable only by a Fulton County Superior Court judge, you will get a court date that will be in Courtroom 8C of the Fulton County Courthouse. The Fulton County Courthouse is located at 185 Central Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. These court dates start at 9:30am.

What are the types of bonds?

There are several types of bonds available for your case.

  1. Released to Pretrial Services: Fulton County will sometimes release people on their own recognizance which means that you do not have to put up any money. You will be monitored by Fulton County Pretrial Services. You will have to report to Pretrial Services until your case gets resolved in court.
  2. Cash Bond: Another option in Fulton County is to pay a cash bond. This means that you pay the entire bond yourself. The benefit to this bond is that it is refundable to you once you resolve your case.
  3. Property Bond: Another option in Fulton County is to post a property bond. In order to post a property bond, you would need to speak to the Fulton Sheriff’s office. They generally will require a warranty deed, a current tax statement showing the property’s fair market value as well as a statement showing all taxes are current. You generally need double the bond amount in equity.
  4. Bail Bondsman: The final option is to call a bonding company. You will pay between 10% – 15% of the total bond to the bonding company. The bonding company will then post the entire bond and you will be released. This 10% – 15% is non-refundable. The Fulton County jail will provide you with a list of approved bonding companies.

If you or your loved one is arrested and taken to the Fulton County jail, please contact us any time and we can assist you in helping get a bond set.

Our office is located in downtown Atlanta at 100 Peachtree Street, Suite 2060, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Feel free to call us at 404-581-0999 anytime day or night. Also, please go to our website at www.peachstatelawyer.com

Call us anytime 24/7. We will have an attorney at your bond hearing the following morning.

 

 

How do I get out of Fulton County Jail?

I’ve Been Arrested…

You are in handcuffs and headed to the Fulton County Jail. You want to get out as soon as possible. Your loved ones are in a panic to find a lawyer to help get a bond set. Rice Street is not a good place to be.

What do I do?

First, do not make any statements to the police while you are being transported to the Fulton County Jail.

Second, do not make any statements about the facts of your case to anyone at the Fulton County Jail. This is not the time to plead your innocence. Your sole focus should be on getting out on bond.

Do NOT talk on the jail phones about the case. All calls at Rice Street are being recorded. Just focus on getting someone to help get you out of jail.

When is my court date?

If you are arrested on a misdemeanor, you will go in front of a Magistrate Judge the following morning at 9am.

If you are arrested on a felony, you will go in front of a Magistrate Judge the following morning at 11am.

Your loved ones should plan on going to the Fulton County jail about 30 minutes prior to court starting. The Fulton County jail is located at 901 Rice Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30318.

Can I get a bond?

The Fulton County Judge is required to consider four factors when setting a bond.

  1. Poses no significant risk of fleeing from the jurisdiction of the court or failing to appear in court when required;
  2. Poses no significant threat or danger to any person, to the community, or to any property in the community;
  3. Poses no significant risk of committing any felony pending trial;
  4. Poses no significant risk of intimidating witnesses or otherwise obstructing the administration of justice.

Some crimes must go before a Superior Court judge in order to have a bond set. If you are charged with any of these specific crimes in Fulton County then the Magistrate Judge cannot set a bond at your initial court appearance. All that will happen at this appearance, is the judge will read the warrants to you and reset your case.

The crimes that are only bondable by a Superior Court judge are as follows:

  1. Treason
  2. Murder
  3. Rape
  4. Aggravated Sodomy
  5. Armed Robbery
  6. Aircraft hijacking and hijacking a motor vehicle
  7. Aggravated Child Molestation
  8. Aggravated Sexual Battery
  9. Manufacturing, distributing, delivering, dispensing, administering, or selling any controlled substance classified under Code Section 16-13-25 as Schedule 1 or under Code Section 16-13-26 as Schedule II
  10. Violating Code Section 16-13-31 or 16-13-31.1
  11. Kidnapping, arson, aggravated assault, or burglary if the person, at the time of the alleged kidnapping, arson, aggravated assault, or burglary, had been previously convicted of, was on probation or parole with respect to, or was on bail for kidnapping, arson, aggravated assault, burglary, or one or more of the offenses listed above.
  12. Aggravated Stalking

For any of these crimes that are bondable only by a Fulton County Superior Court judge, you will get a court date that will be in Courtroom 8C of the Fulton County Courthouse. The Fulton County Courthouse is located at 185 Central Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. These court dates start at 9:30am.

What are the types of bonds?

There are several types of bonds available for your case.

  1. Released to Pretrial Services: Fulton County will sometimes release people on their own recognizance which means that you do not have to put up any money. You will be monitored by Fulton County Pretrial Services. You will have to report to Pretrial Services until your case gets resolved in court.
  2. Cash Bond: Another option in Fulton County is to pay a cash bond. This means that you pay the entire bond yourself. The benefit to this bond is that it is refundable to you once you resolve your case.
  3. Property Bond: Another option in Fulton County is to post a property bond. In order to post a property bond, you would need to speak to the Fulton Sheriff’s office. They generally will require a warranty deed, a current tax statement showing the property’s fair market value as well as a statement showing all taxes are current. You generally need double the bond amount in equity.
  4. Bail Bondsman: The final option is to call a bonding company. You will pay between 10% – 15% of the total bond to the bonding company. The bonding company will then post the entire bond and you will be released. This 10% – 15% is non-refundable. The Fulton County jail will provide you with a list of approved bonding companies.

If you or your loved one is arrested and taken to the Fulton County jail, please contact us any time and we can assist you in helping get a bond set.

Our office is located in downtown Atlanta at 100 Peachtree Street, Suite 2060, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Feel free to call us at 404-581-0999 anytime day or night. Also, please go to our website at www.peachstatelawyer.com

Call us anytime 24/7. We will have an attorney at your bond hearing the following morning.

 

 

Felony Murder

If an individual dies during the commission of a dangerous felony the aggressor can be charged with felony murder even if there was no intent to cause a death. For example, if person X fights person V with no intention of ending V’s life but V ends up dying from his injuries. X will likely be charged with aggravated battery for the beating and felony murder based on the aggravated battery because V died from the injuries he sustained during the felony of aggravated battery by X.

If you or a loved one has been charged with felony murder it is important to reach out to a qualified criminal defense attorney as soon as possible. The penalty for felony murder is the SAME as a murder committed with the intent to kill. It carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison, with or without parole. In Georgia, 30 years of the life sentence must be served before you are eligible for parole. Give us a call at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.

Keeping Evidence of Bad Character Out of Your Trial

It is not uncommon in criminal cases for the state to attempt to introduce evidence of other bad things defendants have done. The Georgia Rules of Evidence are very clear that this evidence can not be admitted for propensity purposes. That means the state can’t introduce bad character evidence just to try to make the jury believe that because a defendant acted a certain way in the past that they acted in the same way during the commission of whatever crime they are charged with. For example, if you are charged with armed robbery, the state cannot admit evidence that you were involved in another armed robbery just to say “because he armed robbed someone in the past, he armed robbed someone this time”. But the state will also often try to use the Rules of Evidence to get around this ban on bad character evidence. If the state can convince a judge that they are attempting to bring in the evidence as proof of intent, motive, knowledge, identity, plan, or purpose, they will be allowed to present the evidence.

Additionally, the evidence the state is attempting to introduce should be kept out if any probative value (i.e., usefulness) is substantially outweighed by prejudice to the defendant. It is important to hire an attorney who will zealously fight to keep any bad character evidence out of your trial. At the Law Offices of W. Scott Smith, we fight to protect our clients and will work tirelessly to prevent the state from being able to introduce this bad character evidence to the jury. If you have been charged with a serious crime like murder, rape, armed robbery, or aggravated assault in Fulton, Cobb, Dekalb, Gwinnett, Clayton, or Rockdale Counties, call our office at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.

What is calendar call or a pretrial court date for a criminal case in Fulton County?

If you are charged with committing a crime, there are many different hearings and/or court dates that you may have to attend. One of those is, what some jurisdictions refer to as, calendar call or pretrial hearing. What is calendar call or pretrial hearing? A calendar call and/or pretrial hearing is a court date where the judge is wanting to know the status of where the case is, i.e., ready for trial or needing additional time.

What is the purpose of calendar call or pretrial? The purpose is to inform the court where the attorneys are in the case so that the court can set the case for trial. Some examples that an attorney would announce at calendar call or pretrial is that negotiations still pending, still reviewing discovery, still investigating, still missing discovery from the prosecutors, still waiting on medical documents or reports, still waiting on testing etc. Generally, nothing of significance happens at this court date unless you plan to enter a plea and close your case out. Some counties have calendar call or pretrial a week or two after arraignment. Typically, the scheduling for calendar call or pretrial is dependent on the county you have a case in and the judge you are in front of. Some counties and judges set calendar call or pretrial a month or two out.

If you or someone you know has been charged with a crime and has a pending case in Fulton County, having a lawyer help you through the process can ensure your rights are protected. Contact the Law Office of Scott Smith today for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

What Kind of Intent is Required for Assault?

According to O.C.G.A § 16-5-20, a simple assault includes any action that places another in reasonable apprehension of immediately receiving a violent injury. This statute includes an element of general intent, meaning that it doesn’t matter what the person performing the action intended to do- it only matters what the person observing the action apprehended.  In other words, there is no requirement that a person intended to create an apprehension of receiving violent injury. Technically, this means that something as simple as shaking your fist at someone (general intent because you intended to do the fist-shaking) could be charged as assault if the victim says that they apprehended a violent injury as a result- even if the accused never intended to actually harm the victim (meaning to cause the harm would be specific intent which is not an element of simple assault in Georgia).

O.C.G.A. § 16-5-21 defines aggravated assault as simple assault combined with one of three statutory aggravators: 1. intent to rob, rape or murder, 2. use of a deadly weapon or an offensive weapon likely to or actually resulting in serious bodily injury, or 3. shooting towards people from a vehicle without justification. There are many things that can be classified as deadly weapons if they are used in an offensive manner: automobiles, firearms, metal pipes, knives, etc. That means that any time a gun is involved and a victim is in apprehension of receiving an injury, regardless of the accused’s intent to harm anyone, aggravated assault charges could result.  It is important to note that aggravated assault still does not require specific intent. Basically, it doesn’t matter what the accused intended, only what the other party perceived.

Aggravated assault carries huge penalties in Georgia and could result in up to 20 years in prison. It is important that your attorney understands the elements of the charged crime and holds the State to their burden. If you have been charged with simple assault or aggravated assault in Fulton, Dekalb, Cobb, Gwinnett, or Clayton counties, you need a lawyer. Call our office today at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.

 

 

Aggravated Assault in Cherokee County

In Cherokee County, Georgia, there are two types of assault offenses that an accused person may be convicted of: simple assault and aggravated assault. Generally, simple assault is classified as a misdemeanor where aggravated assault is a felony offense. In this blog, we will solely discuss the latter.

According to O.C.G.A. § 16-5-21, a person commits the offense of aggravated assault when he/she commits an assault in one of the following aggravating circumstances:

  • The accused has the intent to murder, rape, or rob;
  • The accused commits the assault with a deadly weapon or object in which could result in serious bodily injury;
  • The accused commits the assault with an object, which is likely or is actually used for strangulation; OR
  • The accused commits the assault without legal justification by discharging a firearm from within a motor vehicle.

When the accused person commits an assault in Cherokee County in one of the above-mentioned manners the accused may be sentenced, if convicted, anywhere between 1-20 years in prison. However, the following offenses, as listed below, have different penalties due to the enhanced circumstances that surround the crime:

  • If the accused commits the aggravated assault upon a police officer while he/she is engaged in his/her official duties, the accused person may be sentenced to at least 10 years, but no more than 20 years, in prison if such assault occurs from the discharge of a firearm. However, when the aggravated assault does not involve the discharge of a firearm, the accused person may be sentenced anywhere between 5-20 years in prison;
  • Any person who commits an aggravated assault against the elderly may be sentenced to at least 3 years, but no more than 20 years, in prison. The same punishment is true for any person who commits the aggravated assault in a public transit vehicle or station;
  • If the accused commits the aggravated assault upon public school personnel or on school property, he/she may be sentenced anywhere between 5-20 years in prison;
  • If an aggravated assault is committed against a family member, as defined as “family violence” under Georgia law, the accused may be sentenced to at least 3 years, but no more than 20 years, in prison; and
  • Lastly, any person who commits an aggravated assault with the intent to rape a child under the age of 14 years old may be punished by a prison sentence of anywhere between 25-50 years.

 CONTACT US

Due to the severity of the penalties for an aggravated assault conviction, it is of vital importance to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of W. Scott Smith, our lawyers are trained at defending such charges, we zealously advocate for our client’s rights, and we are knowledgeable about all possible options for an accused dealing with such serious allegations. Therefore, if you or a loved one has been arrested for aggravated assault in Cherokee County, please call our office today at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.