What do you do if you are arrested for possession with intent or trafficking in drugs in Georgia?

If you or a loved one is arrested for Possession with Intent to Distribute or Trafficking in Georgia, it is important that you act immediately to protect yourself. Do not wait until your court date to get an attorney and to preserve evidence.

The District Attorney has a dedicated division to prosecute cases involving Possession with Intent to Distribute or Trafficking. They will vigorously prosecute you if you are charged with a crime involving selling cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines, marijuana or other illegal drugs.   

Do not think that just because you are innocent that the charges will be dismissed. Drug charges are aggressively prosecuted all over the State of Georgia.

Make sure your attorney has had felony jury trials and has won these cases. Do not let an attorney handle your case who does not specifically handle drug cases. Many drug cases are won at a motions hearing. It is imperative that you get body cams, dash cams, search warrants and take witness statements of anyone involved in the search and seizure of the drugs.  

The law may say you are presumed innocent but in drug cases, you have to prove your innocence.

Here is what you should do if arrested for Possession with Intent to Distribute or Trafficking.

  1. Hire an attorney – Make sure that attorney actually handles and tries drug cases. Most criminal defense attorneys do not handle these cases. Make sure the attorney you talk to does regularly handles drug cases in Georgia
  2. Avoid making any statements – Do not walk into the police department and profess your innocence. The police will not believe you. Do not think you can show up at your first court date and tell the prosecutor and judge that you are innocent and expect the charges to be dropped. If you are arrested for possession with intent to distribute or trafficking, you have to start preparing for your jury trial. Do not make any statements to anyone except your lawyer.
  3. Start gathering important evidence
    1. Gather and preserve any physical evidence in your possession.
    1. Gather and preserve any documents that might relate to this accusation including emails, texts, social media, phone records, GPS records, computer records or any other document that might show where you were when this incident allegedly occurred.
    1. Witnesses – Immediately make a list of any person who you think might have information about this accusation. Do not discuss the case with this person but pass this list of potential witnesses to your attorney and let your attorney contact them.

Here is what you should never do if arrested for possession with intent to distribute or trafficking in Georgia.

  1. Never talk to law enforcement or the prosecutor without an attorney.

If you are arrested for possession with intent to distribute or trafficking in cocaine, heroin, marijuana, methamphetamine or any other illegal drug, please call our office 24/7 at 404-581-0999 or send us an email at mike@peachstatelawyer.com. We will sit down with you and fully discuss your case and what to expect in court. There is no charge for the initial consultation. You will only retain us if you feel we are the best law firm to represent you. It is your case and your life so you need to hire the lawyer that you feel gives you the best chance to win.

Homicide in Georgia: Blood

Does it matter in Georgia criminal defense that the victim in a murder case was impaired on drugs or alcohol at the time he was killed?

Yes and no. 

In all homicide cases, pursuant to the Georgia Death Investigation Act, a Georgia medical examiner will perform an autopsy for potential prosecution.  Six of Georgia’s 189 counties have their own medical examiner’s offices including Gwinnett, Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton.  In all other counties in Georgia the individual counties contract with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation to perform their examinations.

What’s the procedure?

In almost all cases the medical examiner will draw central blood, urine and vitreous fluid from the body of the decedent.  However, the medical examiner will not order the bodily fluids to be tested by the forensic toxicology division for impairment.  Further, you must be aware, in a homicide case the GBI will hold the specimens for only 24 months before destroying them.  IN order to preserve and test the samples, the GBI will need a copy of a court order or written authorization from the prosecuting agency to test the samples.

Will this be used in court?

Assuming the results come back as showing impairment in the “victim’s” blood the argument over whether they come in depends on relevance.  Generally, a murder victim’s character is not admissible unless there is some connection as to the reason it is coming in.  Generally speaking, an expert’s testimony as to the effects of the impairing substance will be necessary.

Call us today if you or someone you love has been charged with Murder in the state of Georgia. We would love to meet with you for free. Our number is 404-581-0999.

First Offender Sentencing in Georgia

First offender treatment is available in Georgia for anyone who has not been previously convicted of a felony and is not charged with a serious violent felony. Serious violent felonies are murder, felony murder, armed robbery, kidnapping, rape, aggravated child molestation, aggravated sodomy, and aggravated sexual battery. Anyone charged with one of those offenses is automatically ineligible for first offender unless the charge is reduced to a lesser offense.

If a defendant receives first offender treatment, it can be both a blessing and a curse. If there are no issues during the period of probation, then no official conviction will ever be reported and the record itself will seal from public view. However, if the defendant commits a new offense while on probation or has any issues at all, then the judge has discretion to revoke the first offender status and re-sentence the defendant up the maximum sentence allowed by law.

While serving the sentence which will undoubtedly involve a period of probation, the defendant is not technically convicted of a crime but still cannot possess a firearm. After successful completion, all gun rights are restored.

Finally, first offender status can be granted retroactively if the defendant was eligible for first offender treatment at the time of the original plea but was not informed of his or her eligibility. Still, there is discretion, and the judge must find by a preponderance of the evidence that the ends of justice and the welfare of society are served by granting retroactive first offender status.

If you are charged with a crime in Georgia, then you should always consult with an attorney as to whether you are a candidate for first offender treatment. If you have already pled guilty, then you should still reach out to discuss whether you can receive retroactive first offender treatment. Give us a call today at 404-581-0999.

Atlanta Entering Auto Attorney

by Mary Agramonte

Being arrested for any crime can be a stressful experience. Being arrested for Entering  Auto or Theft by Taking can be even more stressful based on the harsh consequences and the idea of facing a felony charge. If you or your loved one has been arrested for Entering Auto in the Atlanta area, it is important to know your rights and to have a team of lawyers behind you from the very beginning fighting for your freedom.

In Georgia, Entering Auto is a felony offense which carries one to five years in prison. If the person arrested for Entering Auto already has a felony on their record, then they could be facing a lengthier sentence. You can be charged with Entering Auto even if you never stole anything from within the vehicle. The crime is complete soon as you enter the car with the intent to commit a theft or felony. Unfortunately, it is not a defense that the owner of the car gave you permission to go in the car initially.

However, there is good news. If you have been arrested for Entering Auto, there are defenses based on lack of intent to commit the theft, and inability for the State to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. There are ways to avoid the felony conviction as well as the prison time. The judge has the discretion to even sentence you as a misdemeanor for this charge, so you need qualified attorneys ready to present your case in the most favorable way possible.

If you or a loved one has been charged with Entering Auto, it is imperative to get a team of criminal defense attorneys on your side. Having Atlanta Entering Auto attorneys can help you beat the case completely, or minimize the jail and fines. There are defenses to Entering Auto, so do not plead guilty without first talking to an Atlanta Entering Auto attorney. Call us today for a free consultation and know your rights as it relates to an Entering Auto case. 404-581-0999

How Cell Phone Records Can Create an Alibi Defense in Georgia Criminal Cases

by Scott Smith

An alibi is a claim that you were not on the scene when the crime was committed. Alibi is a powerful defense in Georgia.  It is a statement to the jury you were not present when the crime was committed and therefore you cannot be found guilty. Although there are some exceptions, presence of the defendant at the scene is an essential element of the crime.

For the most part, in order to use an alibi defense at trial in Georgia, the defense must serve the prosecutor with an alibi notice upon the prosecuting attorney.  An alibi notice is a written notice of the Client’s intention to offer a defense of alibi. Such notice by the defense attorney shall state the specific place or places at which the client was (i.e. in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) at the time of the alleged offense (i.e. January 5th, 2018) and the names, addresses, dates of birth, and telephone numbers of the witnesses, if known to the client, upon whom the client intends to rely to establish such alibi.  However, if it is the defendant himself who is going to give the alibi defense the defendant is not required to furnish the State’s prosecutor with his version of events or expected testimony.

Alibi is very powerful because the jury must acquit if they cannot put you on the scene.  However, it will be sufficient if the State can show you were near the scene of the crime.  In order to really give potency to your alibi, it is incredibly helpful to show your cell phone (which we all carry around with us all the time) was nowhere near the scene, but in the area you claim to be.  In order to this, you will need to subpoena your cell phone records.

The reason cell phone records are important is that cell phones connect to cell phone antennas to pass data through radio signals.  Your cell phone company records the communication with the cell phone antenna.  Specifically, the phone records include:

  1. Identification of the antenna(s) with which a cell device connects (this includes on newer phones when you are roaming and not actively on a phone call);
  2. The azimuth of the antenna (the direction in which the antenna is pointed) with which the cell device is communicating; and
  3. The time in which the connection was initiated and terminated.

By using this information, the attorney is able to get a general idea of where the cell phone is located.  If you have three cell phone antennas pinging at the same time you can potentially triangulate the location.

Subpoenas for phone records should only be issued by an attorney and they can only be issued if and when there is an established case number and court date.

Here is an excerpt from a March 2018 criminal case (Douglas v. State) in the Supreme Court of Georgia: “The jury also received cell-phone records indicating that, at the time of the shooting, a cell phone belonging to Appellant’s mother was within two miles of the scene; likewise, the jury heard testimony that Appellant was known to sometimes use his mother’s cell phone and to travel in the Ford Taurus with her.”  As you can imagine this testimony and exhibits are powerful evidence.

If you have questions about using cell phone records in Georgia call us today for a free consultation, 404-581-0999.