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Rape

Rape is a serious crime in Georgia. O.C.G.A. § 16-6-1 defines rape as follows:

  1. A person commits the offense of rape when he has carnal knowledge of:
  2. A female forcibly and against her will or:
  3. A female who is less than ten years of age.

Carnal knowledge in rape occurs when there is any penetration of the female sex organ by the male sex organ.  Any penetration, however slight, is sufficient and can be proven by direct or circumstantial evidence. The fact that the person allegedly raped is the wife of the defendant shall not be a defense to a charge of rape.

How do you define “force” in a rape case in Georgia? Force means acts of physical force, threats of death or physical bodily harm, or mental coercion, such as intimidation. Lack of resistance, induced by fear, is force.

The elements of Rape in Georgia are 1) penetration, 2) force, and 3) against her will. If the person is underage, then force is implied. If the person is above the age of consent, but due to mental incompetence or severe intoxication, then finding of constructive force based on penetration.

The law on Rape in Georgia does not require physical injury or semen.

A person convicted of Rape can be punished by death, by imprisonment for life without parole, by imprisonment for life with the possibility of parole or by a split sentence that is a term of imprisonment for not less than 25 years and not exceeding life imprisonment to be followed by probation for life. Any person convicted of rape is subject to the sentencing provisions of O.C.G.A. §§ 17-10-6.1 and 17-10-7.

In addition, the person could be on the Sex Offender Registry for life.

A person convicted of rape can also be held to account for civil liability. Furthermore, if the rape was committed by the defendant while he was acting in his scope of his employment, his employer may also be held liable.


If you face charges in Georgia for Rape, it is imperative that you do not make any statements to law enforcement or to anyone else and immediately seek help from an experienced attorney handling Rape cases in Georgia. You must protect your rights and take this matter very seriously.
The statute of limitation for a prosecution of rape is 15 years.

I would be happy to meet with you any time for a free consultation to discuss your case, your rights and your defenses to these allegations.

Call me at 404-581-0999 and let’s schedule a time to meet and discuss your case.

It is your life, your criminal record and you deserve the best representation possible.

Sexual Assault and Rape Crimes in Georgia

by Mike Jacobs

Rape is a serious crime in Georgia. O.C.G.A. § 16-6-1 defines rape as follows:

  1. A person commits the offense of rape when he has carnal knowledge of:
    1. A female forcibly and against her will or:
    2. A female who is less than ten years of age.

Carnal knowledge in rape occurs when there is any penetration of the female sex organ by the male sex organ.  Any penetration, however slight, is sufficient and can be proven by direct or circumstantial evidence. The fact that the person allegedly raped is the wife of the defendant shall not be a defense to a charge of rape.

How do you define “force” in a rape case in Georgia? Force means acts of physical force, threats of death or physical bodily harm, or mental coercion, such as intimidation. Lack of resistance, induced by fear, is force.

The elements of Rape in Georgia are 1) penetration, 2) force, and 3) against her will. If the person is underage, then force is implied. If the person is above the age of consent, but due to mental incompetence or severe intoxication, then finding of constructive force based on penetration.

The law on Rape in Georgia does not require physical injury or semen.

A person convicted of Rape can be punished by death, by imprisonment for life without parole, by imprisonment for life with the possibility of parole or by a split sentence that is a term of imprisonment for not less than 25 years and not exceeding life imprisonment to be followed by probation for life. Any person convicted of rape is subject to the sentencing provisions of O.C.G.A. §§ 17-10-6.1 and 17-10-7.

In addition, the person could be on the Sex Offender Registry for life.

A person convicted of rape can also be held to account for civil liability. Furthermore, if the rape was committed by the defendant while he was acting in his scope of his employment, his employer may also be held liable.

If you face charges in Georgia for Rape, it is imperative that you do not make any statements to law enforcement or to anyone else and immediately seek help from an experienced attorney handling Rape cases in Georgia. You must protect your rights and take this matter very seriously.

The statute of limitation for a prosecution of rape is 15 years.

I would be happy to meet with you any time for a free consultation to discuss your case, your rights and your defenses to these allegations.

Call me at 404-581-0999 and let’s schedule a time to meet and discuss your case.

It is your life, your criminal record and you deserve the best representation possible.

SB-440

Being Charged as an Adult in Georgia

Part 1: SB-440: Automatic Transfers to Superior Court

 In 1994, Georgia enacted State Bill 440 (more commonly referred to as SB-440) to “provide that certain juvenile offenders who commit certain violent felonies shall be tried as adults in the superior court. This SB-440 law granted adult courts exclusive jurisdiction over criminal cases involving juveniles (ages 13-17) who are charged with one or more of the following “Seven Deadly Sins”:

  1. Murder
  2. Armed Robbery with Firearm
  3. Rape
  4. Voluntary Manslaughter
  5. Aggravated Sexual Battery
  6. Aggravated Sodomy
  7. Aggravated Child Molestation

 

O.C.G.A. 15-11-560(b)

In essence, juveniles (age 13-17) charged with one of the above-mentioned crimes in Georgia will automatically have his or her case  transferred from juvenile court to superior court, where he or she will be charged, tried, and punished as an adult. If convicted and sentenced to prison, the juvenile will not be sent to a Youth Detention Facility through Georgia’s Department of Juvenile Justice. Instead, the juvenile will be housed with other juvenile inmates in the custody of Georgia’s Department of Corrections until he or she reaches the age of 17 and is thrown into the general prison population.

Occasionally, at the discretion of the prosecutor, a SB-440 case may be transferred back to juvenile court after “after investigation and for cause” if the case has not been indicted yet. By contrast, after indictment, a SB-440 case can only be transferred to juvenile court for “extraordinary cause.” O.C.G.A 15-11-560(d), O.C.G.A. 15-11-560(e). Therefore, time is of the essence when it comes to advocating for the case to be transferred back to juvenile court.

If you know someone charged as an adult with an SB-440 crime, PLEASE contact us at the Law Offices of W. Scott Smith. We would be happy to help you with your case and answer any and all of your questions about juveniles charged as adults.