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Fulton County Serious Injury by Vehicle

DUI and Reckless Driving charges are considered misdemeanors in Georgia. However, if you were arrested for DUI or Reckless Driving and there was an accident with serious injuries involved, it is likely you will be arrested for the felony offense of Serious Injury by Vehicle under O.C.G.A. § 40-6-394.

 

A Serious Injury by Vehicle case in Fulton County will be prosecuted by the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office.  It is a felony charge, and the Fulton District Attorney has four years from the date of arrest to bring formal charges against you. Once your case is indicted or accused within the statute of limitations, your first court date will be your Arraignment date. This takes place at the Fulton County Courthouse located at 185 Central Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30303. At your arraignment date, you will have the opportunity to enter a Not Guilty plea and make a demand to see the evidence. It is imperative to have an attorney at this phase in the case because certain Constitutional motions must be filed within 10 days of this court date, or the issues are waived. This means that an attorney must file motions challenging the constitutionality of the stop and the arrest, within 10 days of the Arraignment date, or you will lose the ability to fight the case on these issues later on.

What’s the Difference Between a Misdemeanor DUI and a Serious Injury by Vehicle?

The difference between a felony and a misdemeanor is the punishment and the other collateral consequences. DUI and Reckless Driving are misdemeanor crimes, and thus carry a maximum punishment of 12 months in jail. On the other hand, Serious Injury by Vehicle is a felony charges which could result in much lengthier punishment as society views felonies, generally, more harshly. Specifically, for the felony charge of Serious Injury by Vehicle, the minimum punishment is 1 year in prison, while the maximum is 15 years. Certain factors like the blood alcohol content, or whether there was any prior convictions can elevate punishment significantly. Compare that to a Driving Under the Influence charge where the minimum punishment is just 24 hours along with conditions like community service and DUI school.

What about my License?

The Department of Driver Services also treats this crime harshly, and if you plea or are found guilty of Serious Injury by Vehicle in Fulton County or anywhere in the State, you are facing a driver’s license suspension for a period of three years in addition to the other requirements imposed by the Court.

The State does not have to prove you committed an unsafe act like speeding, cutting someone off, or hitting someone’s vehicle from the back. They can proceed only on the fact you were DUI and caused an injury under the statute, even if you were not the cause of the accident.

In order for the State to prove Serious Injury by Vehicle, they must prove the injuries were serious enough to fall under the statute. Courts have held broken bones, being unable to walk well for a period of time, and certainly brain damage, all to be sufficient for the state to proceed on felony charge.

Take the next step

If you or someone you know have been arrested for Serious Injury by Vehicle in Fulton County or the Atlanta area, it is imperative to meet with a law firm who has a high-level skill in DUI defense as well as in Serious Injury by Vehicle cases. Your future and your freedom depend on it. Call us today for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

 

DUI IN BROOKHAVEN MUNICIPAL COURT

By: Erin Dohnalek

After an accused has been arrested for a DUI, if one of the following occurred, an accused MUST send the 30-day appeal letter to attempt to save his/her driver’s license:

1. After the accused has been arrested, an officer on scene from the Brookhaven Police Department read him/her the correct “Implied Consent” notice and he/she refused to comply with either a blood, breath, or urine test in order to determine his/her blood alcohol content, OR

2. The accused consented to a blood, breath, or urine test and the results showed that the blood alcohol content of the accused was above the legal limit.

If one of the following occurred, it is of vital importance to send the 30-day appeal of the license suspension letter prior to the deadline or risk the suspension of the accused person’s driver’s license. The suspension could last as long as 1 year.

After sending the 30-day letter, the accused must also be ready to defend his/her criminal allegations. The penalties for a DUI conviction are serious, thus, it is of great importance to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who understands all of the elements of the offense, the affirmative defenses to such a charge, and all possible options for the accused.

According to O.C.G.A. § 40-6-391, a person commits driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs when it renders them less safe to drive, the person’s alcohol concentration is .08 or more at any time within 3 hours after such driving occurred, or there is any amount of marijuana or other controlled substances present in the accused person’s blood, breath, or urine.

Once the Brookhaven Police Department transfers the criminal charge to the Brookhaven Solicitor’s Office, the criminal case will begin at a proceeding known as an arraignment. There are a few options when the case has landed here at the Brookhaven Municipal Court. Such options include:

· The accused may plead guilty to DUI, which, for a first DUI conviction, usually will result in 12 months of probation, which requires completion of a Risk Reduction course and at least 40 hours of community service;

· The accused may plead not guilty to DUI and seek a bench trial with the municipal court judge;

· The accused may plead not guilty to DUI and seek a jury trial. This will result in the case being binded over to the Dekalb County State Court, OR

· At arraignment, the accused has the option to speak to the Brookhaven City Solicitor in a pretrial conference to discuss other possible options, such as a reduction from the original DUI charge.

Due to the complexity of a driving under the influence criminal case, as well as the related license suspension proceeding, it is of great importance to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who is skilled at defending such allegations. At the Law Offices of W. Scott Smith, our attorneys are knowledgeable about all possible options for our clients and have vast experience

defending such charges. Therefore, if you have been arrested for driving under the influence, please call our office today at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.

My lawyer told me they are hoping to get my DUI reduced. What can I do to help?

You may not know it, but you can play a huge role in helping your lawyer get the best deal possible for you in your DUI case. Many people assume that in their criminal case, they are at the mercy of the lawyers on both sides, and that they just have to wait until they hear something about an offer or a court date. This is not so. You have lots of power to affect the outcome of your case by being proactive and taking steps to complete required or recommended conditions for folks facing a DUI charge. Taking charge of your case by taking the following steps shows the solicitor that you are proactive and cooperative, and illustrates to the judge that you are taking the charges seriously and you want to handle the case quickly and responsibly. So, what can you do?

  1. Think about enrolling in a DDS-certified DUI School or Risk Reduction Class. There are dozens of convenient locations all over the state to choose from. The class is 20 hours long, and it costs $260 to enroll in the course. Many locations allow the class to be taken virtually or on weekends, so you should be able to easily find a location and time that works with your schedule. Click the following link for more information on finding a Risk Reduction class near you. Make sure that you provide the Certificate of Completion to your defense attorney or to the solicitor at your court date to show them that you have already started taking steps to handle your case. https://online.dds.ga.gov/ddsgeorgiagov/locations/certified-dui-schools.aspx
  2. Take a Defensive Driving class. DDS requires those who have been convicted of DUI to take a 6-hour certified Defensive Driving Class, and completion of the class is oftentimes a condition to getting a solicitor to agree to reduce your DUI charge to reckless driving or another lesser charge. The class is 6 hours and costs $95. Even if you have not been charged with DUI, but you have lots of points on your license, taking this class can remove up to 7 points from your license and reduce the cost of a traffic fine by up to 20%. This class also provides participants who complete the course with a Certificate of Completion that you can provide to your attorney or the solicitor in Court. Click the following link to see schools in your area: https://online.dds.ga.gov/ddsgeorgiagov/locations/driver-improvement-schools.aspx
  3. Talk to a professional and have an alcohol and/or drug evaluation. If you have been charged with DUI in Georgia, solicitors often want to make sure that there is not an underlying substance abuse issue. Reach out to mental health professionals in your area and make an appointment with a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor. They will have you in to discuss your use of drugs and/or alcohol, and make a recommendation if they believe that, based on your discussions, you need treatment to address alcohol or drug use. Be honest with your counselor so that they can make the best treatment recommendation for you that they can. If you have been recommended treatment, go ahead and begin that recommended treatment. Taking that step to improve your relationship with drugs and/or alcohol can be empowering, and it shows the Court that you recognize that you may have an unhealthy habits, but that you are taking steps to improve your mental and physical wellbeing. We know several excellent professionals if you need any help getting started. Feel free to give us a call at the number below.

We attorneys work hard to make your experience smooth and efficient, but it may feel like your case is moving slowly, and distant court dates can hang over you and weigh you down. Checking one or two of the above items off of your list can help to expedite your case, ensure you get a better offer, and can empower you. You are as much a part of your case as the attorney, and we want you to be involved! We have access to resources and information to help you get through this. We want to help. If you have any questions, please contact our office at (404)-581-0999.

After my DUI arrest, the officer took my license. How can I get to work?

If you have been arrested for a DUI in Georgia and an officer took your license, you may be wondering how you can get to work, school, or even your court date without the risk of getting into trouble. If this is you, then take a look at the citation you were given when you were arrested and take a deep breath. At the bottom of the citation, you should see something that says “temporary driving permit.” Georgia law requires an officer who is arresting you for DUI to seize your license. The citation you receive acts as a temporary driving permit for a period of 45 days from the date you were arrested or while your ALS hearing is pending. For information on filing an ALS petition, please check out this blog post: https://www.peachstatelawyer.com/georgia-administrative-license-suspension-als-hearings-during-the-pandemic/

If your license was valid at the time of arrest, the officer MUST give you this permit. If you did not receive the permit and your license was valid, let us know so that we can contact DDS on your behalf.

This permit, unlike a restricted license or a limited permit, is functionally the same as your regular license. You can travel for work or leisure without restriction on this permit. Additionally, you can find your drivers license number on your citation and visit DDS.georgia.gov and select “check license status” to actually view whether or not your license is valid. So long as the website says your license is valid and you have the 1205 form, you should not have to worry about getting pulled over and not having your license on you. However, be sure to bring the 1205 form with you when you drive in case you are stopped.

If your license has been taken because of a DUI arrest, DO NOT WAIT. Call us today. You have 30 days from the date of the arrest to try to save your license, and on the 46th day after the arrest, the 1205 permit expires. We can help.

Call us at (404)-581-0999!

DUI IN COWETA COUNTY

Following a DUI arrest, the State of Georgia has the authority to suspend the driver’s license of the accused in a civil proceeding if one of the following occurs:

  1. After the accused has been arrested for DUI, the arresting officer read the accused the correct “Implied Consent” notice and he/she refused to comply with either a breath, blood, or urine test in order to determine his/her blood alcohol content, OR
  2. The accused consented to a breath, blood, or urine test and the results showed that the blood alcohol content of the accused was above the legal limit.

At this time, the accused has a few options. He/she can either appeal the license suspension or install an ignition interlock device in his/her vehicle for the duration of the suspension. However, the accused MUST make this decision before the deadline is up. The deadline to either install an ignition interlock or appeal a license suspension is 30 days from the date of arrest. If this is not done, there will be a license suspension put in place 45 days after arrest.

In Coweta County, if eligible, and if the accused refused to submit to a breath, blood, or urine test, it is usually advisable to go the ignition interlock device route, instead of appealing the license suspension. If the license suspension is appealed, many police officers in Coweta County will require that the accused plead guilty to DUI in order to dismiss the 1-year license suspension. Therefore, if you have been charged with DUI, and refused the breath, blood, or urine test, and you want to fight your case, it is usually a better option to install an ignition interlock device in your vehicle rather than appeal the license suspension.

THE OFFENSE/ PUNISHMENT

After either installing an ignition interlock device, or appealing the license suspension, the accused must also be ready to defend his/her criminal allegations. According to O.C.G.A. § 40-6-391, a person commits driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs when it renders them less safe to drive, the person’s alcohol concentration is 0.08 grams or more at any time within 3 hours after such driving occurred, or there is any amount of an illegal controlled substance present in the accused person’s blood or urine.

The consequences of a first DUI conviction in the last ten years are at least 12 months on probation, DUI classes and courses, and community service. For a second DUI, the consequences are more serious. There is a mandatory sentence of at least 3 days in jail, heightened community service, and a requirement for an ignition interlock to be installed in the accused’s vehicle. Lastly, for a third DUI, there is a mandatory jail-time sentence of at least 15 days in custody.

Due to the severity of the consequences following a DUI arrest, it is imperative to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney. At the Law Offices of W. Scott Smith, we understand all the possible options for our clients, we are knowledgeable about all direct and collateral consequences of a DUI conviction, and we work tirelessly to advocate for our clients. Therefore, if you have been arrested for a DUI in Coweta County, please call our office today at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.

DUI IN GWINNETT RECORDER’S COURT

After the accused has been arrested for a DUI, if one of the following occurred, the accused MUST send the 30-day appeal letter to attempt to save his/her driver’s license:

  1. After the accused has been arrested, an officer on scene read him/her the correct “Implied Consent” notice and he/she refused to comply with either a blood, breath, or urine test in order to determine his/her blood alcohol content, OR
  2. The accused consented to a blood, breath, or urine test and the results showed that the blood alcohol content of the accused was 0.08 grams or more.

If one of the following occurred, it is of vital importance to send the 30-day appeal of the license suspension letter prior to the deadline or risk the suspension of the accused person’s driver’s license. The suspension could last as long as 1 year.

After sending the 30-day letter, the accused must also be ready to defend his/her criminal allegations. The penalties for a DUI conviction are serious, thus, it is imperative to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who understands all the elements of the offense, the affirmative defenses to such a charge, and all possible options for the accused.

According to O.C.G.A. § 40-6-391, a person commits driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs when it renders them less safe to drive, the person’s alcohol concentration is 0.08 grams or more at any time within 3 hours after such driving occurred, or there is any amount of marijuana or other controlled substances present in the accused person’s blood, breath, or urine.

Once the Gwinnett County Police Department or the Georgia State Patrol, depending on the department that arrested the accused, transfers the criminal charge to the Gwinnett County Recorder’s Court, the criminal case will begin at a proceeding known as an arraignment. There are a few options when the case has landed on an arraignment calendar. Such options include:

  • The accused may plead guilty to DUI, which for a first DUI conviction usually will result in 12 months of probation, as well as completion of a Risk Reduction course, at least 40 hours of community service, and a substance abuse evaluation.
  • The accused may plead not guilty to DUI and seek a bench trial with the Gwinnett County Recorder’s Court judge;
  • The accused may plead not guilty to DUI and seek a jury trial. This will result in the case being bound over to the Gwinnett County State Court; OR
  • At arraignment, the accused has the option to speak to the Gwinnett County solicitor in a pretrial conference to discuss other possible options, such as a reduction from the original DUI charge.

Due to the complexity of a driving under the influence criminal case, as well as the related license suspension proceeding, it is of great importance to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who is skilled at defending such allegations. At the Law Offices of W. Scott Smith, our attorneys are knowledgeable about all possible options for our clients and have vast experience defending such charges. Therefore, if you have been arrested for driving under the influence in Gwinnett County, please call our office today at 404-581-0999 for a free consultation.

Georgia DUI: How many points in a DUI?

In Georgia, a driver’s license will be automatically suspended if engaged in serious traffic violations. Therefore, a DUI does not accumulate any points on your driving record, also called a Motor Vehicle Report (MVR) but carries immediate consequences. For a first DUI conviction (for drivers over the age of 21), your license will be suspended for 12 months by DDS (Georgia Department of Driver Services).

 

Ways a driver can reinstate their license after six months:

  • Your license has already been suspended for 120 days;
  • Completion of a state-approved Risk Reduction Program; and
  • Submit a $210 fine for license reinstatement fees.

Note that this reinstatement will depend on your driving history and will permit you to drive to and from work and school and other permissible places.

 

Contact Us

If you or someone you know has been arrested for driving under the influence, contact the law firm of W. Scott Smith at 404.581.0999 today for a free case evaluation. You’ll find a local Atlanta DUI attorney ready to aggressively fight on your behalf.

Vehicular Homicide Charges in Georgia

Vehicular Homicide in Georgia is a tragic crime that carries harsh consequences.  When someone dies as the result of a traffic infraction, the result is a vehicular homicide criminal case.

Vehicular homicide can either be a misdemeanor or a felony. Vehicular Homicide in the 1st degree is when someone who, without malice aforethought, causes the death of an individual while at the same time committing other certain offenses. These offenses, below, coupled with the death of an individual, will upgrade the charge to a felony:

  • Passing a school bus
  • DUI
  • Reckless Driving
  • Fleeing or attempting to elude
  • Hit and Run
  • While license is suspended due to Habitual Violator Status

Misdemeanor Vehicular Homicide, known as Vehicle Homicide in the 2nd degree, is defined by causing the death of another, without an intention to do so, while violating any other traffic offense in Title 40. (See O.C.G.A. § 40-6-393). These traffic violations may include, for example, failure to maintain lane, running a red light, improper turn, or speeding. Any traffic offense (other than the ones in the bullet points above), which causes the death of another, will result in a Vehicular Homicide charge in the 2nd degree.

In both felony and misdemeanor Vehicular Homicide cases, Georgia law requires that the State prove that the driver’s conduct was a substantial factor in the “proximate cause” of the death.  This means that under Georgia law, sometimes the victim’s own negligence will not be relevant. This is where the defense can lie. Vehicular homicide cases involve intensive investigation phases for the Defense.  The defense may need accident reconstruction experts to quickly determine how and why an accident occurred.

What is the sentence if convicted of Vehicular Homicide?

On a felony Vehicular Homicide, the sentence carried 3 to 15 years in prison on this one charge. If, for example, there were also convictions for misdemeanor offenses, like speeding, from the same accident, the Judge could sentence those consecutively making the prison time much longer.

If convicted of a Vehicular Homicide in the 2nd degree, it is a misdemeanor offense, and the maximum penalty is 12 months in jail and/or a base fine of $1,000.

The Georgia Department of Driver Services will also act to suspend your license on a conviction for Vehicular Homicide. If convicted of a misdemeanor homicide by vehicle, Georgia will suspend your license for a minimum period of 120 days. On a misdemeanor, a limited permit may be available. On a felony homicide by vehicle conviction, Georgia will suspend your license for a period of three years.

If you or a loved one has been charged with Vehicular Homicide anywhere in the State of Georgia, call us today for a FREE CONSULTATION at 404-581-0999. The team of attorneys at W. Scott Smith PC are ready to aggressively defend you in your utmost time of need.

 

Georgia DUI Law: DUI and Your Record

An arrest and/or conviction for DUI in Georgia will impact your record. There are two types of records, a criminal record, maintained by the Georgia Crime and Information Center (GCIC) and your driving record, also called a Motor Vehicle Report (MVR – maintained by the Department of Driver’s Services).

This article serves to explain how a DUI affects your record, both criminal and driving, and whether you can get a DUI taken off of your records.

Georgia Criminal Record

If you are arrested, booked, and fingerprinted, this information will be forwarded to GCIC and placed on your record. If you are applying for a new job, housing, or if your employer runs a background check on you, they will be able to see the arrest on your GCIC. Each arrest is reported as a “cycle,” which shows the date of arrest, the arresting agency, the offense charged, and a “disposition.” The disposition describes the outcome of the case. If the case is still pending, the disposition will show an arrest but no outcome. If you are convicted or the case was dismissed or reduced, the disposition will state as such.

If you are convicted of DUI, whether at trial or through a plea, it will remain on your record permanently. You will not be able to get the record restricted, you cannot get it expunged, you cannot use first offender. This remains true even if your DUI charge was reduced to Reckless Driving.

Georgia Driving Record

Your Motor Vehicle Report (MVR) is very similar to your GCIC. If you have been arrested for DUI and the officer takes your driver’s license in order to facilitate an administrative suspension of your license, your MVR will show a pending administrative license suspension. If this administrative potion of the case is dismissed, your MVR will be cleared up. However, if you are ultimately convicted of DUI through a plea or trial, your MVR will reflect this conviction and you can expect your insurance prices to rise because insurance companies have access to these MVR’s. This conviction will remain on your MVR permanently.

Contact Us

If you or someone you know has been arrested for driving under the influence, contact the law firm of W. Scott Smith at 404.581.0999 today for a free case evaluation. You’ll find a local Atlanta DUI attorney ready to aggressively fight on your behalf. You can also find out more detailed information about Atlanta laws here.

Georgia DUI Law: Challenging the Stop, Driving While Distracted or While Using Mobile Device

Georgia DUI investigations usually begin with a routine traffic stop. At a minimum, in order to stop you and your vehicle, the stopping officer needs to have “reasonable and articulable suspicion” to believe a crime has, or is about to be committed. An officer normally satisfies this requirement by observing a traffic or equipment violation. However, if it is determined the officer did NOT have reasonable and articulable suspicion to stop your vehicle; this could result in the suppression of evidence and the ultimate dismissal of a DUI charge.

Therefore, it is crucial to examine the most common types of traffic violations that result in a DUI investigation. This article serves to inform you of what type of things police officers are looking for when stopping for driving while distracted or while using mobile device.

The Offense

As of July 1, 2018, O.C.G.A. § 40-6-241 requires drivers to exercise due care while operating a motor vehicle on the highways of this state and prohibits “any actions which shall distract such driver from the safe operation of such vehicle.”

In addition, drivers may not:

(1) physically hold or support a wireless telecommunications device or stand-alone electronic device, except for the use of an earpiece, headphone device, or device worn on a wrist to conduct a voice based communication;

(2) write, send, or read any text-based communication, including text messages, instant messages, e-mails, or Internet data, other than voice commands that are converted to text by the device or used for GPS/navigation feature control;

(3) watch a video or movie on a wireless telecommunications device or stand-alone electronic device, other than watching data related to the navigation of such vehicle; or

(4) record or broadcast a video on a wireless telecommunications device or stand-alone electronic device, other than devices used for the sole purpose of continuously recording or broadcasting video within or outside of the motor vehicle.

Commercial vehicle drivers are restricted from using more than a single button on a wireless telecommunications device to initiate or terminate a voice communication or reaching for a wireless telecommunications device or stand-alone electronic device in such a manner that requires the driver to no longer be in a seated driving position or properly restrained by a safety belt.

Exceptions

These prohibitions do not apply if the driver is:

(1) reporting a traffic accident, medical emergency, fire, an actual or potential criminal or delinquent act, or road condition which causes an immediate and serious traffic or safety hazard;

(2) an employee or contractor of a utility services provider acting within the scope of his or her employment while responding to a utility emergency;

(3) a law enforcement officer, firefighter, emergency medical services personnel, ambulance driver, or other similarly employed public safety first responder during the performance of his or her official duties; or

(4) in a lawfully parked motor vehicle.

O.C.G.A. § 40-6-241(g).

Punishment

O.C.G.A. § 40-6-241(f) states that violations are punished as misdemeanors, as follows:

(A) For a first conviction with no conviction of and no plea of nolo contendere accepted to a charge of violating this Code section within the previous 24 month period of time, as measured from the dates any previous convictions were obtained or pleas of nolo contendere were accepted to the date the current conviction is obtained or plea of nolo contendere is accepted, a fine of not more than $50.00, but the provisions of Chapter 11 of Title 17 and any other provision of law to the contrary notwithstanding, the costs of such prosecution shall not be taxed nor shall any additional penalty, fee, or surcharge to a fine for such offense be assessed against a person for conviction thereof;

(B) For a second conviction within a 24 month period of time, as measured from the dates any previous convictions were obtained or pleas of nolo contendere were accepted to the date the current conviction is obtained or plea of nolo contendere is accepted, a fine of not more than $100.00, but the provisions of Chapter 11 of Title 17 and any other provision of law to the contrary notwithstanding, the costs of such prosecution shall not be taxed nor shall any additional penalty, fee, or surcharge to a fine for such offense be assessed against a person for conviction thereof; or

(C) For a third or subsequent conviction within a 24 month period of time, as measured from the dates any previous convictions were obtained or pleas of nolo contendere were accepted to the date the current conviction is obtained or plea of nolo contendere is accepted, a fine of not more than $150.00, but the provisions of Chapter 11 of Title 17 and any other provision of law to the contrary notwithstanding, the costs of such prosecution shall not be taxed nor shall any additional penalty, fee, or surcharge to a fine for such offense be assessed against a person for conviction thereof.

A person convicted of simply holding a mobile device while driving may avoid conviction if they bring to court a device or proof of purchase of such device that would allow that person to operate a mobile device hands-free in the future. However, a person may take advantage of this saving provision only once. O.C.G.A. § 40-6-241(f)(2).

Challenging the Stop

Police officers are looking for distracted drivers, especially those drivers holding their cell phones while driving. If an officer observes this, they would have a lawful reason to stop your vehicle, and possibly launch a DUI investigation. As a result, it is important to challenge the officer’s observations to determine whether the stopping officer has reasonable and articulable suspicion necessary to stop your car. The most successful way to accomplish this is to challenge the officer’s perception. Key issues include, but are not limited to:

  • Distance between the officer and your vehicle
  • Angles of officer’s observation
  • Traffic conditions
  • Lighting
  • Window tint, if any
  • Whether you were lawfully parked

If you or someone you know has been arrested for driving under the influence, contact the law firm of W. Scott Smith at 404.581.0999 today for a free case evaluation. You’ll find a local Atlanta DUI attorney ready to aggressively fight on your behalf. You can also find out more detailed information about Atlanta laws here.