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DUI Less Safe: What is It?

If you’ve been pulled over for a DUI you may have seen a charge on the citation saying “DUI Less Safe.” There’s a lot of confusion about what this actually means. What people most commonly think of is “DUI Per Se” meaning that the authorities have a numerical reading of your blood alcohol content through blood, breath, or urine. If you’re over 21 years old, that means your BAC was above a .08.

On the other hand, “DUI Less Safe” essentially means that the driver is considered less safe to operate a vehicle due to alcohol or drug impairment, regardless of whether they meet the specific BAC threshold for DUI Per Se. DUI Less Safe is common in two scenarios, the first being a refusal of tests that may indicate impairment due to a BAC reading. If a police officer sees certain driving and/or physical manifestations that could indicate alcohol impairment and the driver refuses to perform any sobriety tests, they will usually issue a citation with DUI Less Safe because they do not have the BAC reading to issue DUI Per Se. The second scenario when DUI Less Safe is used is when your blood, breath, or urine shows that there is alcohol in your system, but the BAC is less than .08. Although it may seem strange to receive a DUI when your BAC is under the legal threshold for DUI Per Se, it does happen because the officer has deemed the driver “less safe” to operate a vehicle due to impairment.

If you or a loved one has gotten pulled over for a DUI in Georgia don’t hesitate! Call our office TODAY.

Georgia DUI

When you are pulled over for suspicion of a DUI, the officer will conduct a test called “horizontal gaze nystagmus” or HGN for short. This is the test where an officer will ask you to follow either their finger or a pen to see if the eyes involuntarily jerk or twitch as your eyes move laterally.

The test must be done correctly. The officer must place the stimulus (usually a pen or their finger) 12 to 15 inches away from your nose and slightly above eye level. Then the officer must move the stimulus in a stage consisting of 14 passes. The first stage of passes has the officer moving the stimulus from left to right to center for at least two seconds to check or equal tracking of the pupils.

The second stage has the officer place the stimulus from the center position to your left and back to the center. They will repeat this for the right eye. The stimulus should be moved at a speed that takes at least two seconds from the center position to the side position.

The third stage of passes is designed to determine whether the person has distinct nystagmus at the point in which your eye is fully moved to one side and cannot move any further. The stimulus moves from center to the side taking at least two seconds, holding at the side for at least four seconds, and then moved back to the center in at least two seconds.

The final stage is a set of four passes designed to determine if the onset nystagmus occurs before your eye moves to a 45-degree deviation. It must take at least four seconds to move the stimulus from your center to a spot around your shoulder. The stimulus must be held long enough to confirm the onset nystagmus. Each of the passes in this phase must take at least eight seconds, with a three second count out, a two second count hold, and a three second count back.

 

It is vital to note that the entirety of the HGN test must take AT LEAST 82 seconds- usually around 90 seconds. If the officer is well under that time, then they employed the test incorrectly and the HGN test can be excluded from any evidence that could indicate potential impairment. The stimulus must also remain in the 12 to 15 inch range from your nose and its path cannot loop or curve. If it does, then the officer did not administer the test properly. If you’re pulled over for a DUI, make sure you know the process for HGN evaluation and call our office today.

Tests and Refusals: Know Your Rights

When someone is pulled over for suspicion of DUI in Georgia, they will be asked to perform a series of tasks that could indicate potential impairment to the arresting police officer. It is important to note that these tests are entirely voluntary. If you choose not to perform the tests, your refusal statement cannot be used against you in trial in any attempt to generate incriminating evidence. This is because mandating field sobriety tests would violate the right of self-incrimination. The same can be said when the police officer asks for your consent to any blood testing or breath testing. Although the officer can obtain a search warrant, you do not have to submit to chemical testing on the spot. Do not be misled into believing that if you refuse these chemical tests, your statement of refusal will be used against you at trial.  If you’ve been pulled over for a DUI, contact us today.

I am under 21 and got a DUI… help!

If you are under 21 and have been charged with DUI, it is important to note that there are big differences between defending a DUI when someone is over 21 and a DUI where you were under 21.

The biggest difference between them is the acceptable blood alcohol content for young drivers. While the legal limit for drivers 21 and over is .08, drivers under 21 may not “be in actual physical control of any moving vehicle while the person’s alcohol concentration is 0.02 grams or more at any time within 3 hours after such driving or being in physical control from alcohol consumed before such driving or being in actual physical control ended.” OCGA 40-6-391(k)(1). This means that folks under 21 can drink less and still be considered DUI.

The other main difference is the mandatory minimum punishment under law. For a first offense in 5 years, folks under 21 who plead or are found guilty to DUI must be sentenced to 1 day in jail (although you will receive credit for any time you already served, and may be able to serve your time on weekends or during non-working hours), 40 hours of community service which must be completed within 60 days of the date of sentencing, an alcohol and drug evaluation and any additional treatment recommended by the evaluator, an a DUI Risk Reduction class. You must also be on probation for 12 months. Your license may also be suspended.

If you are under 21 and you have been charged with DUI, it is important to understand your rights and any defenses. Call our office for a free consultation. 404-581-0999.

DUI Probation in Hall County

If you are entering a plea to a DUI in Hall County, under Georgia law, there are certain penalties which the Court must impose when you enter your guilty plea.

According to Georgia Law, O.C.G.A. 40-6-391, if you plead guilty to DUI, the Court must:

  • Assess a fine of not less than $300 (but not more than $1,000
  • Sentence you to 24 hours imprisonment
  • Sentence you to complete 40 hours of community service at a 501(c)(3) organization
  • Require completion of a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program
  • Require completion of a clinical evaluation for substance abuse treatment
  • Require you to serve 1 year on probation.

While on probation, you will also be responsible for paying any supervision fees, you will be regularly drug and alcohol screened, and if you commit any other crimes, you may face even stiffer penalties if your probation is revoked.

These sentencing requirements sound very serious (and they are!) but they are also very discretionary. Hall County judges have a lot of control over the sentence. For example, some judges will allow you to terminate your probation early if you complete any requirements of your sentence in a reasonable amount of time. Other judges will allow you to complete community service in lieu of paying a fine. Some judges will give you credit for any time served in jail at the time of your arrest, and other Hall County judges will not make you serve any time if you complete your probation requirements.

Entering a guilty plea to DUI in Hall County can be a tough pill to swallow. With the right attorney beside you, however, you will have your best chance of reducing the time and money spent on probation and incarcerated. Attorneys are able to present mitigating evidence for the Court’s consideration, and argue why the judge should withhold certain sentence requirements. If you are considering a guilty plea to DUI in Hall County, call our office first. We may be able to help you make the best of a bad situation, and ensure that you are only being sentenced to the absolute minimums. Call us for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

 

Written by Attorney Katherine Edmonds

How do I get a reduction to Reckless Driving in my DUI case?

If you have been charged with DUI, you likely have many questions about what your best options are, how you can best defend your case, and what you can do to help your attorney as they prepare your case and pursue your interests with a prosecutor.

The best thing you can do to help your attorney and improve your prospects for being offered a reduction is to avoid getting additional charges, especially charges involving drugs or alcohol. Getting another DUI while one is already pending can severely hurt your case and reduce your chances of getting a reduction by a great deal.

There are several things you can do to improve the likelihood of getting a reduction. Completing 40 hours of community service at a 501(c)(3) organization is one task that costs nothing, and is generally a required term of probation. The organization cannot be religiously affiliated, but volunteering at an animal shelter, public library, or soup kitchen are all great ideas.

Completing a Mothers Against Drunk Driving Victim Impact Panel can also be beneficial. This online panel consists of individuals sharing their stories about the impacts of drunk driving. You can sign up here: https://online.maddvip.org/.

Taking a DDS-sponsored Risk Reduction class is also generally a condition of probation. There are online and on-the-road options available all over Georgia. For a list of locations and their contact information, visit this link: https://online.dds.ga.gov/ddsgeorgiagov/locations/certified-dui-schools.aspx.

The last thing you can do is get an alcohol and drug assessment done. This can be through any State-sponsored provider, and can be done in person or over the phone. The cost of the assessment varies depending on the provider, so you may choose to shop around to find the right counselor for you. If, after your evaluation is complete, any treatment is recommended, you can also help your attorney by working on the recommended treatment.

These steps show integrity and proactiveness, and can be good mitigating evidence for your attorney to provide to the prosecutor. For questions or a free consultation, call us at 404-581-0999.

 

DUI Probation in Bartow County

If you are entering a plea to a DUI in Bartow County, under Georgia law, there are certain penalties which the Court must impose when you enter your guilty plea.

According to Georgia Law, O.C.G.A. 40-6-391, if you plead guilty to DUI, the Court must:

 

  • Assess a fine of not less than $300 (but not more than $1,000
  • Sentence you to 24 hours imprisonment
  • Sentence you to complete 40 hours of community service at a 501(c)(3) organization
  • Require completion of a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program
  • Require completion of a clinical evaluation for substance abuse treatment
  • Require you to serve 1 year on probation.

While on probation, you will also be responsible for paying any supervision fees, you will be regularly drug and alcohol screened, and if you commit any other crimes, you may face even stiffer penalties if your probation is revoked.

These sentencing requirements sound very serious (and they are!) but they are also very discretionary. Bartow County judges have a lot of control over the sentence. For example, some judges will allow you to terminate your probation early if you complete any requirements of your sentence in a reasonable amount of time. Other judges will allow you to complete community service in lieu of paying a fine. Some judges will give you credit for any time served in jail at the time of your arrest, and other Bartow County judges will not make you serve any time if you complete your probation requirements.

Entering a guilty plea to DUI in Bartow County can be a tough pill to swallow. With the right attorney beside you, however, you will have your best chance of reducing the time and money spent on probation and incarcerated. Attorneys are able to present mitigating evidence for the Court’s consideration, and argue why the judge should withhold certain sentence requirements. If you are considering a guilty plea to DUI in Bartow County, call our office first. We may be able to help you make the best of a bad situation, and ensure that you are only being sentenced to the absolute minimums. Call us for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

 

Written by Attorney Katherine Edmonds

DUI Probation in Henry County

If you are entering a plea to a DUI in Henry County, under Georgia law, there are certain penalties which the Court must impose when you enter your guilty plea.

According to Georgia Law, O.C.G.A. 40-6-391, if you plead guilty to DUI, the Court must:

 

  • Assess a fine of not less than $300 (but not more than $1,000
  • Sentence you to 24 hours imprisonment
  • Sentence you to complete 40 hours of community service at a 501(c)(3) organization
  • Require completion of a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program
  • Require completion of a clinical evaluation for substance abuse treatment
  • Require you to serve 1 year on probation.

While on probation, you will also be responsible for paying any supervision fees, you will be regularly drug and alcohol screened, and if you commit any other crimes, you may face even stiffer penalties if your probation is revoked.

These sentencing requirements sound very serious (and they are!) but they are also very discretionary. Henry County judges have a lot of control over the sentence. For example, some judges will allow you to terminate your probation early if you complete any requirements of your sentence in a reasonable amount of time. Other judges will allow you to complete community service in lieu of paying a fine. Some judges will give you credit for any time served in jail at the time of your arrest, and other Henry County judges will not make you serve any time if you complete your probation requirements.

Entering a guilty plea to DUI in Henry County can be a tough pill to swallow. With the right attorney beside you, however, you will have your best chance of reducing the time and money spent on probation and incarcerated. Attorneys are able to present mitigating evidence for the Court’s consideration, and argue why the judge should withhold certain sentence requirements. If you are considering a guilty plea to DUI in Henry County, call our office first. We may be able to help you make the best of a bad situation, and ensure that you are only being sentenced to the absolute minimums. Call us for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

 

Written by Attorney Katherine Edmonds

DUI Probation in Rockdale County

If you are entering a plea to a DUI in Rockdale County, under Georgia law, there are certain penalties which the Court must impose when you enter your guilty plea.

According to Georgia Law, O.C.G.A. 40-6-391, if you plead guilty to DUI, the Court must:

 

  • Assess a fine of not less than $300 (but not more than $1,000
  • Sentence you to 24 hours imprisonment
  • Sentence you to complete 40 hours of community service at a 501(c)(3) organization
  • Require completion of a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program
  • Require completion of a clinical evaluation for substance abuse treatment
  • Require you to serve 1 year on probation.

While on probation, you will also be responsible for paying any supervision fees, you will be regularly drug and alcohol screened, and if you commit any other crimes, you may face even stiffer penalties if your probation is revoked.

These sentencing requirements sound very serious (and they are!) but they are also very discretionary. Rockdale County judges have a lot of control over the sentence. For example, some judges will allow you to terminate your probation early if you complete any requirements of your sentence in a reasonable amount of time. Other judges will allow you to complete community service in lieu of paying a fine. Some judges will give you credit for any time served in jail at the time of your arrest, and other Rockdale County judges will not make you serve any time if you complete your probation requirements.

Entering a guilty plea to DUI in Rockdale County can be a tough pill to swallow. With the right attorney beside you, however, you will have your best chance of reducing the time and money spent on probation and incarcerated. Attorneys are able to present mitigating evidence for the Court’s consideration, and argue why the judge should withhold certain sentence requirements. If you are considering a guilty plea to DUI in Rockdale County, call our office first. We may be able to help you make the best of a bad situation, and ensure that you are only being sentenced to the absolute minimums. Call us for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

 

Written by Attorney Katherine Edmonds

DUI Probation in Cherokee County

If you are entering a plea to a DUI in Cherokee County, under Georgia law, there are certain penalties which the Court must impose when you enter your guilty plea.

According to Georgia Law, O.C.G.A. 40-6-391, if you plead guilty to DUI, the Court must:

 

  • Assess a fine of not less than $300 (but not more than $1,000
  • Sentence you to 24 hours imprisonment
  • Sentence you to complete 40 hours of community service at a 501(c)(3) organization
  • Require completion of a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program
  • Require completion of a clinical evaluation for substance abuse treatment
  • Require you to serve 1 year on probation.

While on probation, you will also be responsible for paying any supervision fees, you will be regularly drug and alcohol screened, and if you commit any other crimes, you may face even stiffer penalties if your probation is revoked.

These sentencing requirements sound very serious (and they are!) but they are also very discretionary. Cherokee County judges have a lot of control over the sentence. For example, some judges will allow you to terminate your probation early if you complete any requirements of your sentence in a reasonable amount of time. Other judges will allow you to complete community service in lieu of paying a fine. Some judges will give you credit for any time served in jail at the time of your arrest, and other Cherokee County judges will not make you serve any time if you complete your probation requirements.

Entering a guilty plea to DUI in Cherokee County can be a tough pill to swallow. With the right attorney beside you, however, you will have your best chance of reducing the time and money spent on probation and incarcerated. Attorneys are able to present mitigating evidence for the Court’s consideration, and argue why the judge should withhold certain sentence requirements. If you are considering a guilty plea to DUI in Cherokee County, call our office first. We may be able to help you make the best of a bad situation, and ensure that you are only being sentenced to the absolute minimums. Call us for a free consultation at 404-581-0999.

 

Written by Attorney Katherine Edmonds