Bond is a constant balancing act between protecting society from alleged wrongdoers and preventing excessive incarceration before having one’s guilt proven beyond a reasonable doubt. The main purpose of bond is to ensure that the accused returns to court.

However, judges frequently include special conditions in a bond order. Sometimes, the defendant is ordered not to have any contact with the alleged victim or any co-defendants in his or her case. Sometimes, there are curfews and/or restrictions on places that the defendant can visit. If the defendant is alleged to have violated a special condition, then the prosecutor will seek to revoke the defendant’s bond. If this happens, the defendant is afforded minimal protections. The rules of evidence do not apply in a bond revocation hearing so hearsay is admissible, and the standard of proof is only by a preponderance of evidence. With that said, these hearings can be valuable in assessing the credibility of the alleged victim. If you can catch the alleged victim in a lie at the bond revocation hearing, then you can use that dishonesty to attack their credibility at trial, or a reasonable prosecutor may be willing to negotiate a reduction in the charges or a complete dismissal.