Every state has enacted laws prohibiting the entering the home of another without permission of the occupant. This article serves to explore Georgia specific laws regarding this conduct and the penalties if convicted.

Burglary – The Offense

O.C.G.A § 16-7-1, a person commits the offense of burglary in the first degree when, “without authority and with the intent to commit a felony or theft therein, he or she enters or remains within an occupied, unoccupied, or vacant dwelling house of another or any building, vehicle, railroad car, watercraft, aircraft, or other such structure designed for use as the dwelling of another.”

A person commits the offense of burglary in the second degree when, without authority and with the intent to commit a felony or theft therein, he or she enters or remains within an occupied, unoccupied, or vacant building, structure, railroad car, watercraft, or aircraft.

“Dwelling” is defined as any building, structure, or portion thereof which is designed or intended for occupancy for residential use. Burglary is a specific-intent crime; the state must prove that the defendant intended to commit a felony after making an unauthorized entry. Dillard v. State, 323 Ga.App. 333 (2013). Furthermore, the offense of burglary does not require proof that defendant’s entry into victim’s apartment was forced; rather, all that is required is finding that the defendant entered or remained in apartment without victim’s authority, with intent to commit felony or theft therein. Dupree v. State, 303 Ga. 885 (2018).

Burglary – The Punishment

A person who commits the offense of burglary in the first degree shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than 20 years. Upon the second conviction for burglary in the first degree, the defendant shall be guilty of a felony and shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than two nor more than 20 years. Upon the third and all subsequent convictions for burglary in the first degree, the defendant shall be guilty of a felony and shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than five nor more than 25 years.

A person who commits the offense of burglary in the second degree shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than five years. Upon the second and all subsequent convictions for burglary in the second degree, the defendant shall be guilty of a felony and shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than eight years.

Home Invasion – The Offense

O.C.G.A. § 16-7-5 creates a separate criminal offense of home invasion in the first degree when a person, “without authority and with intent to commit a forcible felony therein and while in possession of a deadly weapon or instrument which, when used offensively against a person, is likely to or actually does result in serious bodily injury, he or she enters the dwelling house of another while such dwelling house is occupied by any person with authority to be present therein.”

A person commits the offense of home invasion in the second degree when, without authority and with intent to commit a forcible misdemeanor therein and while in possession of a deadly weapon or instrument which, when used offensively against a person, is likely to or actually does result in serious bodily injury, he or she enters the dwelling house of another while such dwelling house is occupied by any person with authority to be present therein.

As we can see, the difference between first degree home invasion and second degree home invasion relates to intent, where the former requires proof of intent to commit a felony and the latter requires proof of intent to commit a misdemeanor.

Home Invasion – The Punishment

A person convicted of the offense of home invasion in the first degree shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by imprisonment for life or imprisonment for not less than ten nor more than 20 years and by a fine of not more than $100,000.00. A person convicted of the offense of home invasion in the second degree shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than five nor more than 20 years and by a fine of not more than $100,000.00.

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